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    New Blog Address: management.curiouscatblog.net

    Monday, December 05, 2005

    Google: Ten Golden Rules

    Google: Ten Golden Rules by Eric Schmidt and Hal Varian:

    At google, we think business guru Peter Drucker well understood how to manage the new breed of "knowledge workers." After all, Drucker invented the term in 1959. He says knowledge workers believe they are paid to be effective, not to work 9 to 5, and that smart businesses will "strip away everything that gets in their knowledge workers' way." Those that succeed will attract the best performers, securing "the single biggest factor for competitive advantage in the next 25 years."


    Google really is doing things differently. One way you see it is that some of those used to being the most powerful players complain that they don't get respect at Google, at Google the engineers rule. Um, maybe they shouldn't complain too loud, maybe the reason Google is doing better is they focus on the Gemba (where value is added to the customer).

    Googling For Gold:

    The suits inside Google don't fare much better than the outside pros. Several current and former insiders say there's a caste system, in which business types are second-class citizens to Google's valued code jockeys. They argue that it could prove to be a big challenge in the future as Google seeks to maintain its growth. They deem the corporate development team as underpowered in the company, with engineers and product managers tending to carry more clout than salesmen and dealmakers.


    Truthfully Google is a special case. Still managers should learn from Google's success. Google isn't afraid to take risks and try things that others are won't. It seems to be working pretty well.

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